Wednesday, 29 June 2011

White-rumped Shama

White-rumped Shama
White-rumped Shama (Copsychus malabaricus) was formerly classified as a member of the thrush family and was called as the White-rumped Shama Thrush or simply Shama Thrush.
White-rumped Shama
Males are black with a chestnut coloured belly with a white feathers on the rump and the outer tail. The female resembles the male but the black is replaced by a a slaty brown and the chestnut by rufous. The iris is dark brown, bill black and the feet is flesh coloured.
White-rumped Shama
It is a forest bird and is found in thick jungles and ravines. It is well known for its song, for which it has been kept as a cage bird and introduced into far off places such as Hawai.

White-rumped Shama
Their typical habitat is in bamboo undergrowth. They are shy birds and are active during twilight – dawn and dusk (crepuscular).
White-rumped Shama
It feeds mostly on the ground, searching for insects, worms and fallen fruit, but flies up into the trees when disturbed.
White-rumped Shama
The breeding season is from April to June. The nest is a cup of dead leaves lined with grass and placed in the base of bamboo clumps. It is built entirely by the female while the male stands guard.
White-rumped Shama
Sighting Information:
Location: Mudumalai
Date: 29th May 2011
Time: Afternoon; 12:30 PM
Weather: Overcast
Other Details: Seen on the roadside in a bamboo clump in the forests of Mudumalai national park, singing away.