Monday, 8 December 2008

Lapwings.

My wife and I finally headed out to Slimbridge Wildfowl and Wetland centre. We took our bikes along on the train and then cycled 4 miles to get to the centre. On our way we caught sight of what appeared to be Lapwings to me, but I wasn’t sure as I had never seen a lapwing in UK before.

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As we got closer, we could more or less confirm that there were indeed Lapwings.

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Finally we came across a group that sat relatively close to the road, but with the constant traffic on route and unaware of how much more distance we had left to cover, we didn`t stay long.

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It was inside Slimbridge centre that a better opportunity to snap these birds finally came up.

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The lapwing is the largest wader in the UK. It is also called the peewit due to its distinctive “peewit” call:

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A noticeable feature of this bird is its long crest. Both males and females have them but the male’s crest is Longer.

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The lapwings are so called for its broad rounded wings and slow wavering flight.

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Most of the British Lapwings are resident during winter but some may migrate to Ireland, France or Spain.

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However, winter populations are thought to significantly increase by the arrival of migrants from elsewhere.

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The lapwings were once a common bird in UK but numbers have significantly fallen and they are now on the amber list with regards to conservation.

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They are mostly found on farmlands around the UK but mostly in the northern England and eastern Scotland.

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They are mostly insectivorous and their diet is chiefly composed of worms (as seen in the picture below) and insects.

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Its been great catching what I first thought was a very shy sociable bird this close on camera. They do indeed make some great subjects to photograph.

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